Quick Answer: Why did the United States ultimately decide to support the French?

Why did the United States ultimately decide to support the French rather than Ho Chi Minh’s forces in the Indochina War? The U.S. wanted to stop the spread of communism in Asia. Ho Chi Minh’s military doctrine hinged on fighting only when victory was assured, which meant never fighting on his opponents’ terms.

Why did the United States decide to support the French in Indochina?

The rationale of the decision was provided by the U.S. view that the Soviet-controlled expansion of communism both in Asia and in Europe required, in the interests of U.S. national security, a counter in Indochina.

Why did the US support the French in the Vietnam War?

America wanted France as an ally in its Cod War effort to contain the Soviet Union. Truman believed that if he supported Vietnamese independence, he would weaken anticommunist forces in France. To ensure French support in the Cold war, Truman agreed to aid France’s efforts to regain control over Vietnam.

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Why did the United States give support to the French in Indochina during the early 1950s?

Initially the United States had little interest in Vietnam and was equivocal about supporting France, but in 1950, due to an intensification of the Cold War and a fear that communism would prevail in Vietnam, the U.S. began providing financial and military support to French forces.

Why did the United States support French efforts after WWII to re colonize Vietnam?

The day Japan surrendered to the Allies, Ho Chi Minh declared independence in front of a crowd of exhilarated Vietnamese. … But when France went to war to recolonize Vietnam in 1945, the U.S. government needed its ally’s cooperation to contain the spread of communism in Europe.

Why did the US support Ho Chi Minh?

Ho Chi Minh became a communist in the 1920s and launched a revolution back home in the 1940s after the Japanese occupied French Indochina during World War II. … So, the US provided him with weapons and training teams to help teach his Viet Minh guerrillas how to fight.

Why did the United States support a change in South Vietnamese leadership?

Why did the United States support a change in South Vietnamese leadership? The United States saw that Ngo Dinh Diem was alienating South Vietnamese citizens. Diem’s anti-Buddhist policies and refusal to enact land reforms weakened the South Vietnamese public’s support for the fight against North Vietnam.

Why did the United States support canceling elections in South Vietnam?

Ho Chi Minh was a communist. Why did the US support canceling elections in Vietnam in 1956? They would win, (Ho Chi Minh). … US commander in South Vietnam asks for more troops, thinks we will win a war of attrition.

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What was the US involvement in the Vietnam war?

The United States got involved to prevent South Vietnam from falling into communist hands. At first, the U.S. operated behind the scenes, but after 1964, sent combat troops and became more deeply mired in the war. Following France’s defeat in the First Indochina War, an international agreement divided Vietnam in two.

Why did the United States provide military aid to the French in Indochina quizlet?

Why did the United States provide military aid to the French in Indochina? … China’s fall to communism and the outbreak of the Korean War helped convince President Truman to aid France.

How did France colonize Indochina?

France obtained control over northern Vietnam following its victory over China in the Sino-French War (1884–85). French Indochina was formed on 17 October 1887 from Annam, Tonkin, Cochinchina (which together form modern Vietnam) and the Kingdom of Cambodia; Laos was added after the Franco-Siamese War in 1893.

Why did the US government chose to provide economic and military assistance to the French for their war in Indochina?

North and South Vietnam

Under President Harry Truman, the U.S. government provided covert military and financial aid to the French; the rationale was that a communist victory in Indochina would precipitate the spread of communism throughout Southeast Asia.