What was Versailles Class 9?

The Palace of Versailles was the principal royal residence of France from 1682, under Louis XIV, until the start of the French Revolution in 1789, under Louis XVI. It is located in the department of Yvelines, in the region of Île-de-France, about 20 kilometres southwest of the centre of Paris.

What do you mean by Versailles in history?

Versailles. / (vɛəˈsaɪ, -ˈseɪlz, French vɛrsɑj) / noun. a city in N central France, near Paris: site of an elaborate royal residence built for Louis XIV; seat of the French kings (1682–1789).

What is Versailles theory?

The treaty required Germany to disarm, make ample territorial concessions, and pay reparations to certain countries that had formed the Entente powers. … Although it is often referred to as the “Versailles Conference”, only the actual signing of the treaty took place at the historic palace.

What are the terms of Versailles Treaty Class 9?

The Allies declared that Germany was responsible for the war and therefore had to pay reparations (compensation for damages). The total cost was to be calculated as equal to the damages caused by the war to civilian property. A special committee was to be established to set the price for the German government to pay.

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What were the main features of Treaty of Versailles Class 9?

The main terms of the Versailles Treaty were: (1) The surrender of all German colonies as League of Nations mandates. (2) The return of Alsace-Lorraine to France. (3) Cession of Eupen-Malmedy to Belgium, Memel to Lithuania, the Hultschin district to Czechoslovakia.

What Empire was the Versailles in?

Louis XIV ruled France for 72 years, and in that time transformed Versailles by encompassing Louis XIII’s chateau with a palace that contained north and south wings, as well as nearby buildings housing ministries. Versailles was built to impress.

What was Versailles originally used for?

The original residence was primarily a hunting lodge and private retreat for Louis XIII (reigned 1610–43) and his family. In 1624 the king entrusted Jacques Lemercier with the construction of a château on the site. Its walls are preserved today as the exterior facade overlooking the Marble Court.

Who won World war 1?

The Allies won World War I after four years of combat and the deaths of some 8.5 million soldiers as a result of battle wounds or disease. Read more about the Treaty of Versailles.

What was the Versailles Treaty?

The Treaty of Versailles is one of the most controversial armistice treaties in history. The treaty’s so-called “war guilt” clause forced Germany and other Central Powers to take all the blame for World War I. This meant a loss of territories, reduction in military forces, and reparation payments to Allied powers.

What is the Treaty of Versailles summary?

Introduction. The Treaty of Versailles was signed by Germany and the Allied Nations on June 28, 1919, formally ending World War One. The terms of the treaty required that Germany pay financial reparations, disarm, lose territory, and give up all of its overseas colonies.

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What is Treaty of Versailles Class 9 Brainly?

The main terms of the Versailles Treaty were: (1) The surrender of all German colonies as League of Nations mandates. (2) The return of Alsace-Lorraine to France. (3) Cession of Eupen-Malmedy to Belgium, Memel to Lithuania, the Hultschin district to Czechoslovakia.

When was Treaty of Versailles?

The Treaty of Versailles, 1919 28 June 1919. After four years of devastating fighting, the First World War came to an end in 1919 in Versailles. The treaty, which represented “peace” for some and a “diktat” for others, also sowed the seeds of the Second World War, which would break out twenty years later.

Who wrote Treaty of Versailles?

Who were the key people involved in drafting the Treaty of Versailles? The chief people responsible for the Treaty of Versailles were U.S. Pres. Woodrow Wilson, French Premier Georges Clemenceau, and British Prime Minister David Lloyd George.