Question: What did the First Estate do in the French Revolution?

The First Estate was the clergy, who were people, including priests, who ran both the Catholic church and some aspects of the country. In addition to keeping registers of births, deaths and marriages, the clergy also had the power to levy a 10% tax known as the tithe.

What did the first estate do during the French Revolution?

1. The First Estate was one of France’s three social orders. It contained all persons ordained in a Catholic religious order, from cardinals and archbishops down to priests, monks and nuns. 2.

What was the first estate responsible for?

Their responsibilities included: the registration of births, marriages and deaths; they collected church taxes (usually 10%); they censored books; served as moral police; operated schools and hospitals; and distributed relief to the poor. They also owned 10-15% of all the land in France.

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What did the estate do in the French Revolution?

This assembly was composed of three estates – the clergy, nobility and commoners – who had the power to decide on the levying of new taxes and to undertake reforms in the country. The opening of the Estates General, on 5 May 1789 in Versailles, also marked the start of the French Revolution.

What was life like for the first estate?

The First Estate were mostly the catholic clergy. They were 1% of they population,and owned 15% of the land. They refused to pay taxes. The clergy also ran schools, kept records, and supported the poor.

What is the meaning of first estate?

Definition of first estate

: the first of the traditional political estates specifically : clergy.

What problems did the first estate have?

One of the first issues that came up at the Estates General was how they would vote. The king said that each estate would vote as a body (each estate would get 1 vote). The members of the Third Estate did not like this. It meant that they could always be outvoted by the much smaller First and Second Estates.

What did the Third Estate do in the French Revolution?

The Estates-General had not been assembled since 1614, and its deputies drew up long lists of grievances and called for sweeping political and social reforms. The Third Estate, which had the most representatives, declared itself the National Assembly and took an oath to force a new constitution on the king.

What was the estate system in France?

France under the Ancien Régime (before the French Revolution) divided society into three estates: the First Estate (clergy); the Second Estate (nobility); and the Third Estate (commoners). The king was considered part of no estate.

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What did the Third Estate want in the French Revolution?

The Third Estate wanted one man, one vote which would allow them to outvote the combined First and Second Estates.

What was the Estate General Class 9?

Answer: The Estates-General was an assembly comprising the clergy of the French nobles and the middle class. … The Estates-General represented all of France’s three estates. This assembly combined the First, Second and Third Estate members and acted as France’s legislative assembly.

How was the First Estate divided?

The First Estate comprised the entire clergy, traditionally divided into “higher” (nobility) and “lower” (non-noble) clergy. In 1789, it numbered around 130,000 (about 0.5% of the population).

What was the Third Estate answers?

In the pamphlet, Sieyès argues that the third estate – the common people of France – constituted a complete nation within itself and had no need of the “dead weight” of the two other orders, the first and second estates of the clergy and aristocracy.

What did the second estate want in the French Revolution?

Whereas the King sought tax reform, the First and Second Estates sought to protect their power and privilege. The Third Estate wanted greater representation and greater political power to address issues of inequality.

Why was the estate system in France unfair?

The causes of the French Revolution were that the Estate System was unfair, the government of France was into much debt, and was therefore taxing too much, and that people resented the power of the Church. … The Church also had money, but were not required to pay taxes. This caused the third estate to demand reform.

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How did the second estate contribute to the French Revolution?

In total, the Second Estate made up between one and one and a half per cent of the population. … These exemptions became a significant cause of the French Revolution, as France’s Third Estate (commoners) realised they were carrying the financial burden of the nation.